Actor Peter Crombie, popularly known for his role as “Crazy” Joe Davola on Seinfeld, has reportedly died at the age of 71.

Crombie’s ex-wife, Nadine Kijner, announced the sad news of her husband’s demise on an Instagram post.

“It is with shock and extreme sadness that I share that my ex-husband died this morning,” Kijner began the post. “Thank you for so many wonderful memories and being such a good man. Fly free into the Unboundless source of light, Peter. May you be greeted with love by your parents and Oliver. So many people loved you because you were a kind, giving, caring and creative soul.”

Kijner later revealed to a news outlet that Crombie had been diagnosed with a brief illness before his passing. Further details about Crombie’s cause of death have not been revealed.

In the popular sitcom, Crombie played the role of a psychopath obsessed with terrorizing the character Jerry Seinfeld. His character, which was named after TV producer Joe Davola, appeared in five episodes during season four.

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According to The New York Post, Crombie also made appearances in films including Star Trek: Deep Space X Nine, The Doors, The Blob and House of Frankenstein amongst others. His last on-screen appearance was in 2000 when he had a recurring role on Walker, Texas Ranger.

Many Hollywood performers have poured in tribute to remember Crombie’s legacy.

“Am heartbroken by the death of my good friend Peter Crombie. He was a gifted artist,” comedian Lewis Black wrote on X. “Not only was he a wonderful actor but an immensely talented writer. More importantly, he was as sweet as he was intelligent and I am a better person for knowing him.”

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According to reports, Crombie was born on June 26, 1952, and grew up in a neighborhood outside of Chicago. He attended the Yale School of Drama.

Crombie and Kijner met in Boston in the late 1980s before getting married in 1991. They divorced after about six years of marriage but remained friends.

“He was like a rock,” Kijner said. “He was someone you could always call and lean on.”